Suniva & GS Battery To Develop Energy-storing Solar Systems

>> Feb 12, 2010

29. Januar 2010

Suniva & GS Battery To Develop Energy-storing Solar Systems

Georgia, United States [RenewableEnergyWorld.com]

Suniva Inc. will collaborate with GS Battery Inc., the American subsidiary of GS Yuasa International Ltd., a battery and inverter development company, to develop solar powered energy storage systems using Suniva's solar modules.

As of January 1, 2010, battery storage systems qualify under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act for the same 30 percent federal investment tax credit as solar systems.

The collaboration between Suniva and GS Battery will begin with the planning and development of several commercial demonstration sites across the United States. The first system will use 30 kilowatts (kW) of Suniva’s solar modules and will be built on GS Battery’s headquarters in Roswell, Georgia.

This solar array, which is designed, engineered and constructed by Atlanta-based solar integrator First Century Energy, will also be the first grid-connected energy-storing solar installation in Georgia.

As of January 1, 2010, battery storage systems qualify under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act for the same 30 percent federal investment tax credit as solar systems.

“Solar system owners that are able to store their energy output are also able to take advantage of many new economic opportunities,” said Yasuyuki Nakamura, President of GS Battery. “Our state of the art approach allows customers to achieve better returns on investment with a more flexible and profitable solar energy supply. We are excited about the value of utilizing Suniva’s high-powered modules with our battery technology.”

Under the partnership, GS Battery will use Suniva’s high-efficiency solar modules, Powered by Suniva, which consist of Suniva’s ARTisun series monocrystalline solar cells, in its energy-storing solar systems. Suniva modules can achieve power output up to 300 watts, which is one of the highest performance levels in today’s solar industry.

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